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Author Archive for Jon Corra

Individual Unemployability vs. 100% Schedular Rating

Since there is a lot of misinformation about the VA Disability Process many veterans aren’t aware of how certain aspects work. For instance, many Veterans assume that VA disability works just like Social Security Disability. Social Security Disability is a program in place for individuals who can’t work because of their disabilities. VA Disability Compensation allows Veterans to work while still receiving the benefit. Let’s examine how this works in more detail today.

First, a program like social security disability is one in which you are either granted or denied. So in other words, you either get it or you don’t. There’s not really a gray area with social security. This contrasts with VA Disability which is granted to Veterans on a scale from 0% to 100%. So, you can be granted VA Disability and not be compensated. This would be a 0% rating. Veterans are paid different amounts depending upon how high they are rated. A rating of 10% might be $133.00, while a Veteran being paid at 100% might receive over $3,000 per month. This is some discrepancy on the amount a Veteran receives after he or she reaches 30% because they can file for dependents.

One of the biggest differences between social security and VA disability is the amount you can work after you are approved. In VA disability, a Veteran can be paid at 100% and still work full time. While some individuals receiving, social security can still work, it’s only for very short periods of time for a set amount of money. On VA disability, however, you can make as much money as you’d like and still receive benefits. There is, of course, an exception.

Any Veteran pursuing VA disability compensation will tell you that it’s not an easy accomplishment. Further, getting rated at 100% the traditional way, which we refer to as a scheduler, is even more difficult. In reality, to be paid at 100% in a traditional sense, you have to be paid between 190% and 230%. That is very difficult. So, many Veterans pursue 100% compensation via a different route, individual unemployability.

Individual Unemployability, or IU, is a program in place to compensate Veterans at the 100% rating, even though they are not actually rated at 100%. The way it works is based upon ratings. If a Vet is rated at 60% or more for a single condition, they may be eligible for IU if their disabilities keep them from working. Further, a Veteran rated on multiple conditions at a total of 70% or more may be able to receive IU as long as one of the conditions is rated at 40%. However, receiving IU, over-scheduler rain means that you can’t work. In all honesty, you can’t work full time on IU at all. You may go to school, but working is out of the question.

We know how confusing this process can be. This why so many people turn to the attorneys at Jan Dils Attorneys at Law. Our team is focused on VA Disability, and we know how to get results. To learn more about the services we offer, or to learn how to become a client, call us via our toll-free number. 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form, and we will be happy to call you at a better time.

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Coast Guard Veterans and PTSD

Anyone who has read this blog before knows that I am a huge fan of the US Coast Guard. Just last week I returned to Cleveland, Ohio and took just as many pics of the ships at the Coast Guard base as I did at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. My friends who served in other branches of the military give me a hard time for being such a Coast Guard fan. At the end of the day, the Coast Guard is a branch of the military and Coast Guard Veterans are entitled to VA disability compensation just like someone who served in the Navy, Army, Air Force, or the Marines. However, I still hear from Coast Guard Veterans who aren’t aware that they can service connect for PTSD. Today, we will discuss how Coast Guard Veterans can service connect for PTSD in more detail.

As you may already know, the Coast Guard is not a part of the Department of Defense like the other branches. Instead, the Coast Guard is a part of the Department of Homeland Security. Further, except for rare instances, the Coast Guard isn’t deployed into combat zones. Because most Coast Guard Veterans aren’t combat Veterans, many don’t believe they are eligible to service connect for PTSD. It’s not true, though. We actually see this problem across the board. Veterans from every branch feel the same way. Regardless if you served in the Coast Guard, Marines etc., serving in combat is not required pursue a claim for PTSD. The biggest difference for Veterans who served in combat versus those who haven’t involves proving a stressor. For combat Veterans, simply being in combat will serve as the stressor. However, all non-combat Veterans must prove their stressor.

What are some stressors for Coast Guard Veterans? One of the first instances I think of pertains to any Coast Guard Vet who worked in search and rescue. Often time these individuals are exposed to a lot of death and tragedy. The Coast Guard is often dispatched in cases of missing persons or when ships and boats go missing near our shores or rivers. These search and rescue missions happen quite often, and they don’t always end well. Repeated exposure to the death of civilians can lead to PTSD.

One area that must be considered also is any type of severe physical injury. With the type of work that the Coast Guard does, injuries can occur quite often. A few Coast Guard Veterans I’ve spoken to have described near drowning events in their stressors. Any situation in which you are fearful of your life can result in a traumatic experience.

Another area in which a stressor can exist would be if a member of the Coast Guard was physically or sexually assaulted. This occurs often in all branches of the military, and the Coast Guard is no different. It’s quite common for this type of experience to lead to PTSD symptoms, especially if the Veteran fails to report the assault.

Some individuals in the Coast Guard have to enforce maritime law. They are essentially performing the same duties as police officers, only in a different capacity. These Vets are often exposed to a lot of criminals and can be involved in physical altercations, just like police officers. However, unlike typical police officers, these Veterans often encounter many foreign and domestic terrorists, drug dealers, and criminals.

 

If you are a Coast Guard Vet and are curious about your PTSD claim, call us today for a free consultation. We’d be happy to talk to you about the services we offer. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457! If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so that we may call you at a better time.

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Who is Considered a Veteran?

There are a lot of questions you must ask yourself when you are applying for VA Disability Compensation. What conditions are related to my time in service? Which doctors have I treated with for these injuries? Will my family be taken care of if something happens to me? However, one simple question you may forget to ask yourself is; am I a Veteran?

It may seem like a simple question to answer. However, it’s not that black and white. I joined this firm in March of 2011. In that time, I’ve met a lot of people who thought they were Veterans who weren’t, and a lot who thought they weren’t Veterans but were.

Before we get too far down the rabbit hole, let’s look at how the VA defines who a Veteran is. Essentially, a Veteran is a person who served in active military, naval, or air service, and did not receive a dishonorable discharge. The latter part of this condition is met if you received a general, medical, or entry level discharge. If you received any other type of discharge, the VA must determine that your discharge was other than dishonorable.

One area in which many men and women get confused falls under length of time. Too often people think that they must serve a specific time to be considered a Veteran. That’s not true. Many Veterans enter the military for a set period, but they must be discharged early for several reasons. Here is a common example we witness. An individual joins the military on a 4 year enlistment. Near the end of the 2nd year, they injure their ankle and are no longer found fit for duty. In this case, that individual will likely receive a general discharge because of medical reasons. When he recovered, he’d likely be assigned a general discharge, and he’d be sent home.  Keep in mind that this person has done nothing wrong, he was found unfit for duty. The military can’t really punish a person for that, especially if the injury was not intentional. This also doesn’t mean that this person should lose their Veteran status. Though our firm does not deal with education benefits, we’ve heard that a general discharge means that you may have some issues with your education benefits.

We also meet some men and women who think that the only people who can be considered Veterans are those who served in combat, or served overseas. This is also not true. For the most part you have very little control over where the military sends you, or if you are deployed to combat. So, the military and the VA can’t really hold that against you.

What about people who think that they are Veterans, who aren’t? There are a few times in which this can be issue. You may assume that it goes without saying that anyone who didn’t serve in the military isn’t a Veteran. It’s also important to note that the spouse of a Veteran, and the children of a Veteran, are not considered Veterans (unless they also join the military.) Also, individuals who participated in ROTC programs in high school or college, but never entered the armed forces, are not considered Veterans. Finally, anyone who received a dishonorable discharge is .

If you are a Veteran and would like to know more about the services we provide, call us today for a free consultation. Our Number is toll -free 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk right now, fill out this form, and we will call you at a better time.

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Learn How Our C-File Review Team Better Serves Veterans

Filing for VA disability can be very difficult, especially if you do it alone. So, many Veterans turn to attorneys for help with their claims. But, how does an attorney help with a VA disability claim? Attorneys will, of course, represent you at a trial, help you with medical record requests, and more. However, one of the most important aspects of any VA disability case is your C-File Review. Our law firm recently created a department dedicated to Claims File Reviews to better serve our clients. Why is your Claims file so important, and why would a law firm invest so many resources into developing a special department just for the review of these files? Let’s discuss that today.

First, let’s talk about C-Files. Other than general medical evidence a claim file is probably the single most important aspect of any case. For the most part, a claim file is massive. Depending upon how long the Veteran served, the C-file can be anywhere from a couple hundred pages long to several inches thick. Your c-file is the physical record of your time in service. It includes your entrance exams, medical evaluations, administration records, service treatment records, VA medical records after discharge. I’m not being hyperbolic when I say that you can learn nearly all there is to know about someone after reading their C-file. At the C-file review, we can see the true strength or weakness of a case.

The Review

I will be blunt, not everyone can be a c-file reviewer. I know that I can’t do it. It requires concentration, discipline, and an attention to detail that I simply don’t have. When one does a review, they are looking for evidence to support each of the Veteran’s claims. Granted, if he or she only has one claim, and a short file, this isn’t too difficult. That’s a rarity, though. Most Veterans have multiple claims and their c-files are thick. Keep in mind that sometimes a person reviewing the file may have to search through thousands of pages of records to find small pieces of evidence to support a claim. It’s not just military medical records in these files too. Sometimes we have to look through admin records, or ship logs to prove a Veteran was in a certain location at a specific time.

We even find mistakes made by the VA. During the review, if the Veteran has filed a previous claim, we review the decisions made by the VA to see if any mistakes were made. We do find mistakes from time to time. We pride ourselves on this level of commitment and attention to detail. Finding mistakes can make a huge difference for our clients.

Why a Team?

In the past, we only had a few people who could properly evaluate a c-file. However, because the review is so crucial, and the information can be so intricate, we decided to develop a special team to better evaluate our client’s C-files. As you know, so many important pieces of information come from this file. With that in mind, we wanted to be more thorough with our reviews and also evaluate them quicker. So, we assembled a team of people to review them. This team includes a mix of existing veteran employees and new team members. All the c-file reviewers went through a tough training program in order to make it on the team. The strength in numbers is helpful too when we receive the files from the VA. Sometimes they arrive in paper form and have to be sorted.

Once again, the C-file is one of the most important aspects of any VA Disability Claim. We pride ourselves on the hard work of all of our team members, and this C-File team is an exciting new way to better serve our clients. We are dedicated to helping Veterans get the benefits they deserve.

If you’d like to know more about the VA Disability services we provide, or if you’d like to become a client, call us today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form, and we will be happy to call you at a more convenient time.

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Camp Lejeune Presumptive Benefits Approved for Veterans

Over the past year, there has been a lot of discussion regarding VA Disability Service Connection and Veterans who served at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. We’re happy to say that the final rule to make the presumptive conditions official came through yesterday.

This rule establishes presumptive service connection for former service members, to include veterans, reservists, and National Guard members, who served at least 30 days at Camp Lejeune between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987.

The following presumptive conditions are approved:

  • Adult leukemia
  • Aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes
  • Bladder cancer
  • Kidney cancer
  • Liver cancer
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and
  • Parkinson’s disease

According to the Military Times, as many as 900,000 Veterans could be impacted by this news. Many Veterans have fought tirelessly over the years to get service connected for the water contamination at Camp Lejeune, and we are happy to say that for some, that fight may well be over soon.

To review, the VA has listed the following requirements to establish service connection:

Be an active duty, reserve or National Guard member who was discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.

Have served at Camp Lejeune for at least 30 days (cumulative), between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987.

Have a current disease on the list of presumptive conditions related to Camp Lejeune.

The VA lists the following Evidence Requirements:

Records that show you served at Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River for at least 30 days (cumulative), between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, in an active duty, reserve, or National Guard capacity.

The medical evidence must show you have a current disease on the list of presumptive conditions related to Camp Lejeune.

If you’d like to know more about what we can do for you, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so that we can call you at a better time. Since 2008 we’ve helped thousands of Veterans get the benefits they deserve, and we won’t take no for an answer.

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I Get a Little Help From My Friends; How Buddy Statements Impact Your VA Claim

When it comes to Veterans Disability, one of the most important aspects of any case is evidence. For the most part, this pertains to medical evidence. For instance, if you’re pursuing a claim for your shoulder, you would likely have medical records from your time in service and from the VA and private doctors after your time in service. However, there is not always medical evidence of an injury in service. This is especially true for combat injuries. If you’re in the middle of a firefight, you can’t call a “timeout” if you fall and hurt your ankle. Most Vets I’ve talked to just get back up and keep fighting. In other words, there’s not always a perfect medical record for every disability claim.

The same is also true for mental disabilities like PTSD, or neurological conditions like Traumatic Brain Injury. These injuries are not always diagnosed in service. Usually, they manifest later in life. So, the traditional means of establishing service connection is not always able to be obtained. So, what is a Veteran to do? There is actually an option for this situation.

Sometimes, when attempting to establish service connection, a Veteran may make use of a “statement in support of claim.” These are also sometimes referred to as “buddy statements.” For the most part, these statements are supplied by individuals who either served with the Veteran filing for benefits, or a friend/family member who knew the Veteran before and after he/she entered the military. In some cases, the Veteran may also make a statement in support of claim, but for the purposes of today’s blog, we will just focus on the statements made by others.

First, let’s look into buddy statements. These make a lot of sense because they almost act as an eyewitness report of something that occurred. For instance, if you were serving in a combat zone and an RPG blew up, knocking you unconscious, one of your fellow Vets was likely there with you. There may not be an official record of this in any log, but if you can have at least one other person, or even multiple people, write statements about it occurring, it will help your chances of establishing service connection.

Another way in which we’ve seen buddy statements be effective pertains to cases of Military Sexual Trauma. If a Veteran was sexually assaulted and he/she knew another Veteran who was sexually assaulted by the same person, they can write a statement explaining their experience.  This is beneficial because so many sexual assaults go unreported in the military. However, it’s not the only way in which a buddy statement can be used to aid an MST case. If a Veteran was sexually assaulted, didn’t report it, but confided in his or her fellow service member, they could then write a statement explaining what happened. This is even true several years after the assault occurred.

Just like buddy statements, a statement from a family member can be beneficial in cases of MST and PTSD. Though in most cases your family and friends didn’t serve with you, they can still speak to how your behavior or mood changed after joining the military. For instance, if you were outgoing before, loved going out and had a lot of friends before you were in the military, but after discharge, you were more withdrawn, alone and rarely left your house, this would be a way a family member could explain how you’ve changed. Even in cases not involving PTSD or MST, statements from family members can be beneficial. We see this often in cases of Sleep Apnea.

Statements are just one of the ways in which we help our clients put together strong cases to help them get the benefits they deserve. If you’d like to know more about what we can do for you, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so that we can call you at a better time. Since 2008 we’ve helped thousands of Veterans get the benefits they deserve, and we won’t take no for an answer.

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How Veterans Service Connect for Headaches and Migraines

While doing our ‘end of the year countdown,” we realized that for the second year in a row, our most popular blog was about Veterans with headaches. That blog post was written way back in 2014 when the world was more innocent. The hit TV show Parks and Recreation were still on the air, and Justin Bieber’s new album was still months away. They were good times. That blog has held up well over time, but it won’t hurt to revisit the topic. So, let’s take another look at headaches and your VA disability claims.

Pertaining to headaches, one of the biggest misconceptions Veterans believe is that their headaches are normal, and thus not service connected. I’m not judging because this makes sense to me. When I was in 1st grade I started having severe migraines on a regular basis. They were so bad that I would become sick, then I would become nauseous and eventually vomit. As I got older, the migraines became less frequent and I eventually “grew out of them.” I still get headaches now. Most of my headaches are brought on by stress. Headaches can be difficult because of there so many people who haven’t served who have issues with headaches too. The major difference between what I experienced, and what a Veteran experience are that my headaches are preexisting. Most Veterans who have a headache condition do not have a preexisting condition. However, a preexisting condition would not necessarily keep them from getting service connected. The important thing to remember about headaches and any condition for that matter is that it must either be caused by your time in service or made worse by your time in service.

There are many ways in which a Veteran can have issues with headaches because of service. Any type of head injury can lead to headaches later in life. For instance, if a Veteran suffered from a TBI while serving he or she may have headaches after service. Even if a Veteran doesn’t have a head injury they can still pursue a headache claim. This is especially true if you sought treatment in service.

One thing we must consider when pursuing a claim for headaches is; “What exactly is a headache?” In my previous blog, I explain the process in detail. You can read that here. However, I want to make things a little simpler today.

The following is an example of a Veteran who likely wouldn’t get service connected for their headaches: The Veteran seldom has headaches. When they do, they are not very severe, and they are easily alleviated by taking over the counter medicine like Tylenol.  On average, the type of a headache occurs once every six weeks.

The following is an example that would likely result in a Veteran receiving service connection for headaches. This Veteran has headaches at least three times per week, and they are prostrating. Prostrating sort of means debilitating. In other words, the pain from your headache is so severe that the Vet is unable to function. Generally, this means they must retreat to a bedroom with no light, no sound, and sleep until your headache is resolved, often hours later. There is a good chance the Veteran misses work often because of their condition.

Once again, if you want to read the full explanation, please see my previous blog post.

I was surprised by the number of people who turned to my old blog post for help. Obviously, this means that there are a lot of Veterans still suffering from headaches, and many still need help. If you think you may have a headache condition that should be service connected, give us a call today. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form, and we’ll be happy to talk to you at a better time. Our consultations are Free, and we’ve helped thousands of Veterans get the benefits they deserve.

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How Disabled Veterans Can Receive Student Loan Forgiveness

Student Loan debt impacts millions of recent graduates every year. Most of you are already aware of that as it’s in the mainstream news quite often. However, what you are likely not aware of is the number of Veterans who struggle with student loan debt also. I was surprised at first to learn that so many Veterans struggled with student loan debt. If you’re like me, you simply assumed that all veterans qualify for the Montgomery GI Bill and thus their college was paid for by the government. That’s not true.

Did you know that a Veterans who was discharged with a general under honorable condition discharge is not eligible for the GI Bill? If you’re reading that and you don’t have much knowledge of military discharges, you might think that a General Under Honorable is a bad discharge. It’s not. To be honest, a lot of Veterans are discharged with this type of discharge. It does not mean they did anything wrong. Traditionally it means that they were not able to fulfill their entire commitment. In other words, if a Veterans enlisted for four years, but only served three due to an injury, he or she may receive a general under honorable discharge. Further, a lot of Vets who are injured receive General Under Honorable discharges. On the surface, a General Under Honorable Discharge resembles an Honorable Discharge. It’s not just the character of a Veterans discharge that may have led them to student loans. In some cases, the GI Bill may not have been enough to cover all fees. This could be the case if the Veteran attended graduate school, an out of state school, or even went to college or university for an extended period. So, now it makes sense that a Veteran could have debt from higher education. Now we have to ask what they have to do to eliminate that debt.

This reminds me of a story. When I was in college I met this fella who served in the Navy. I can’t tell you his name or many details because he eventually became a client. Regardless, the first year we had classes together I didn’t like him very well. The next year we had another class together and the professor forced us to work together. We realized that we had some similar interests and, as any coming of age teen comedy will tell you, we became friends. And, just like in that same teen comedy, after college, we lost touch. As I was completing graduate school I started working here. I discovered this thing called Facebook. Naturally, I looked up my old friend. As I was working in Veterans Disability at the time, and he was a disabled Veteran, I thought it would make sense for him to become a client. Eventually, my friend became a client, we got him a well-deserved rating of 100%, and all was well.

One day, while reading through my Facebook timeline, I noticed that my friend mentioned that he had all his debt from college eradicated. If I’m honest, he was bragging about it in a way he shouldn’t have been, but it peaked my interest none the less. Due to injuries, he was not able to fulfill his contract with the military. He received a general discharge, and thus, didn’t receive the full GI Bill. Prior to this Facebook post, I was not aware of any Student Debt forgiveness for Veterans. So, I did what we all do when we something unfamiliar on the internet, I Googled it.

My search results were quite helpful. According to my research, Veterans who receive a 100% Total and Permanent Disability from the VA may also have their Federal Student Loans discharged. In this context, the word discharge means forgiven. Granted, there are a lot of details to this program and a lot about finance that I really can’t interpret. My source for this information is a government website. If you are interested in this program I suggest checking it out.

I don’t believe enough Veterans are aware that they may be able to have their student debt forgiven. Like I mentioned earlier, we assume that every person who served in the military and went to college was able to attend for free. It turns out that it’s not true, and a lot of Veterans are missing out on this program. If you know of a Veteran who may benefit from Student Loan forgiveness, please share the link above with them.

Further, many Veterans are rated too low for their disability ratings. If you believe your ratings are too low, call us today for a Free Consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. You can contact us using this form as well. Thanks so much for reading.

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Knee Issues and Your Veterans Disability Claim

I often like to write about the unique cases we see at the law firm. Some of my favorite memories of helping Veterans pertains to very specific conditions. Sometimes we must work hard to prove that a Vietnam Veteran was exposed to Agent Orange, or we must go the extra mile to show how a Veteran who was not in combat has a stressor related to their time in service. Those cases stick out because they aren’t very common, and we usually learn a lot from those favorable decisions. Though those cases really peak our interests, it’s the more common cases that we see the most, and that impact the highest number of Veterans. One such condition involves disabilities impacting the knees. So, let’s talk about your knee conditions in more detail today.

If I oversaw the VA, and hopefully someday I will be, I would automatically grant all Veterans service connection on their knees. Unfortunately, I am not in charge of the VA, and knee conditions are sometimes difficult to prove. Some may wonder why I think most Veterans should get granted service connection on their knees. It’s quite simple. If you served, take a moment to think about all the abuse your knees went through while you were in service. All Vets must go through PT, ruck marches, and a lot of physical work every day. Further, a lot of MOS’s are very physical. It’s hard to think of many occupations in the military that aren’t physical. The most common ones we encounter are mechanics, infantrymen, Calvary Scouts, truck driver and so on. All of those are very physical. Most of the Veterans I’ve talked to with MOS’s like these have moderate to severe knee issues when they leave the military. Then you have Veterans who have MOS’s associated with jumping from a plane. Veterans who have a parachutist badge, or those who are Rangers, Airborne, and so on, are among the most likely to have knee issues. If you’ve even completed one Jump from a plane with a landing that is less than ideal, then it’s very likely that you’ll have a knee condition.

While it may seem simple for Veterans with the previously mentioned backgrounds in service to get granted for their knees, the opposite is true. Knee conditions are difficult to get service connected. It’s not a black and white issue, though, there are several reasons why a Veterans may struggle to get service connected for their knees.

One of the biggest reasons that Vets have issues getting service connected for their knees involves a lack of treatment in service. This isn’t specific to knee conditions, though, it’s a problem across the board. However, with knee issues, many Vets will simply purchase an OTC knee brace, or treat with Motrin. They don’t seek specific care for their knees in service, and thus establishing service connecting for the condition is difficult. It’s not a deal-breaker, though. For many of our clients, we argue that your MOS or length of service contributed to your knee condition. We also use buddy statements. So, if a fellow Vet witnessed your injury, he or she may be able to write a statement to help you get connected.

Another import thing to remember is to get treatment on your knees after you’re discharged. The will deny your claim if you don’t have current treatment.

 

While treatment is a big issue, it’s not the only thing that makes service connecting for knees difficult. A more complex issue arises when we look at how the VA evaluates knee conditions. Your pain is not paramount when a medical professional evaluates you for your knees. Knee conditions are based on a range of motion, not pain. In other words, you may be in a lot of pain, but if you can flex your knee so far in either direction, your’ likely to get denied. Most Veterans aren’t aware of this when they travel to their C&P exam.

 

Traditionally, a knee is rated at 0%, 10%, or 20%. On the other hand, some Vets can get rated at 30% for each knee. This is traditionally the result of a Veterans needing knee replacements. It’s rare for younger Veterans to be given knee replacements, mainly because doctors advise against it for individuals under a certain age. One of the main reasons for this involves the amount of pains associated with knee replacement surgery. Overall, the only way to get rated above 20% on a knee is to have a replacement. Granted, there are always exceptions to the rule, but this is the norm.

 

Some Veterans, who have issues with their knees, also have issues with falling or instability. It’s important to note that this condition is rated separately from a knee condition. Once again, most Veterans aren’t aware that they can file this claim separately from their knees. Let’s be clear, though, not every Veteran who has a knee condition will also have issues with instability. Also, just because you’ve been granted on a knee issue, it does not mean the VA will grant you on instability quickly. You will have to prove that separately.

 

The most important thing I want you to know if you’re a Veteran reading this blog is to get treatment on your knees if you have pain in one or both knees. If you believe your pain is a result of your time in service, call us. We’d be happy to talk to you about your condition and give you a free case evaluation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you would rather have us give you a call later, fill out this form, and we’ll call you at a more convenient time.

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5 Tips for Veterans this Holiday Season

The holiday season seems to start earlier and earlier each year. I saw Christmas trees for sale in September at a local retailer. Not only does the season startblog photos 046 earlier, it seems as if we have more to do. I am single without kids, and I have no fewer than six Holiday parties to attend. Plus I have to buy Christmas presents and plan a lot of activities around the holidays. It’s easy to get distracted and not pay attention to important things. During the holiday season, a lot of Veterans neglect their disability cases and that can be recipe for disaster. But there are some simple things that you can do to keep your disability claim focuses and to manage stress this holiday season.

  1. Schedule appointments thoughtfully. You still need to go the doctor even though the snow is falling and there’s Christmas spirit in the air. Now, this can be tricky during the holiday season. However, it can be done. Let’s say you are working parent with two Children and your spouse is also employed. Well, you’re likely going to have a bunch of parties and activities to attend. You and your spouse will probably both have a work related holiday party to attend. You will also likely have a few functions to attend with your kids at their schools. If you have a bunch of friends, you will likely have to do something with them. So, November and December can get busy. However, you likely know well in advance when you’re going to have these events, so it can be easy to plan things ahead. Just make sure to sync up your schedule with that of your doctor’s office, and I am sure they can work you in at a convenient time. Just stick to your appointment. Don’t cancel it last minute unless you have to.
  2. Take advantage of special days that aren’t very busy. Every doctor’s office is different. However, in our area, it seems like a lot are open on days like Black Friday and Christmas Eve. (If it falls on a weekday.) Schedule appointments for these days because they aren’t likely to be very busy. I had to help my mother get blood work last year. We went to the lab on Christmas Eve. We didn’t have to park far from the building, we waited for two minutes, and then we had the blood work drawn. We were in and out in 10 minutes.
  3. Manage stress like a champion. Holiday shopping is the worst, and I say that as a fella who does not mind spending the day at the mall. However, holiday elfshopping leaves me wanting to pull my remaining hair out. I’ve never gone shopping on Black Friday, and this year will be no different. I am going to buy a record number of gifts online this year. With Amazon Prime, I really can’t go wrong buying online now. I get free two-day shipping on most of the things I buy and they have everything. If you’re a Veteran with PTSD, the mall on Black Friday is not a great place to be. Plus you have to deal with traffic, cold weather, and all around nastiness. Stay home, grab your smartphone, and you’ll be good to go.
  4. Spend time with your friends. This may sound odd, and I am not a psychologist, but spending so much extra time with coworkers and family can drive you crazy. It’s not that you don’t love these people, but a lot of extra time around them can have it’s moments. So, find time to hang with your friends this holiday season. Especially your true friends. In many cases, these people may your fellow Veterans. If it’s not, just make time for the people who you have the most fun with no matter what time of year it is. I do this with my oldest friend Shawn every year. We hang out, just the two of us. We have a gift exchange in which we buy gifts for each other that our family won’t. This usually means Hot Wheels cars and Action figures. Then we normally head to Athens, OH, see a movie, and just have a great time being ourselves. I highly recommend it for everyone.
  5. Have fun. I am so glad I live in a time when odd Christmas celebrations are embraced. I live for a Yankee Swap, Ugly Christmas Sweater party, and even a Festivus Celebration. They are the most fun you can have at Christmas. Stuffy parties are so 1996. Take some time to celebrate something that is just supposed to be fun.

Well, I wish you a Happy Holiday Season. Remember to have fun this Christmas. However, don’t let your case go by the wayside. If you would like some help with your claim, give us a call today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. Or fill out this form if you’d like to be contacted at a different time.

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