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Who is a Veteran?

By Jan Dils · November 10, 2011
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The VA Disability process can be quite confusing. As one goes through appeals, and decisions, it can be overwhelming at times. This can be true for the most basic of information too. For instance, are you a Veteran? Many of those who have served in military would automatically say yes. Often times this is true, but it is important to know how the VA defines the term “Veteran.”According to the VA, The term “Veteran” means a person who served in the active military, naval, or air service and who was discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable.The terms of your discharge have a lot to do with your eligibility for VA disability compensation benefits. The type of discharge one receives can have an affect on which benefits one is eligible be for through the VA.If you are interested in more information about VA Disability Compensation, or if you would like a free phone consultation, call our office at 1-877-526-3457 or tell us about your claim now.

What is an SOC?

By Jan Dils · November 7, 2011
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In the legal process of VA Disability Compensation, you may hear the term “Statement of the Case,” and are probably wondering what that means. In your legal timeline, a Statement of the Case or SOC comes after your “Notice of Disagreement.” Once your Notice of Disagreement is filed through the VA, they will make a decision. (This will often occur several months later.) This decision is referred to as a Statement of the Case.

So, now we know when it comes, but we still have to decide what it is in regards to your claim for VA Disability Compensation. Essentially an SOC is a decision. However, this decision is a little more detailed than your initial decision you received from the VA. The SOC will explain in detail why you were denied for your disability. They will often quote specific statues, and use legal terms to explain why they denied your claim. It can be, and most often is, a very confusing form. They also tend to be quite lengthy.

Unlike an NOD, a Veteran only has sixty (60) days to file the next form of appeal, which is referred to as a VA form 9. The sixty days starts on the date on the SOC, not from the time a Veteran receives the document.

Interpreting an SOC can be difficult, that is why so many Veterans seek the legal help of attorneys like the ones at Jan Dils Attorney sat Law. We have the people, knowledge, and resources to help you get the benefits you deserve. For a free phone consultation, give us a call at 1-877-526-3457.

What is an SOC?

By Jan Dils · November 7, 2011
CATEGORIES:

In the legal process of VA Disability Compensation, you may hear the term “Statement of the Case,” and are probably wondering what that means. In your legal timeline, a Statement of the Case or SOC comes after your “Notice of Disagreement.” Once your Notice of Disagreement is filed through the VA, they will make a decision. (This will often occur several months later.) This decision is referred to as a Statement of the Case.

So, now we know when it comes, but we still have to decide what it is in regards to your claim for VA Disability Compensation. Essentially an SOC is a decision. However, this decision is a little more detailed than your initial decision you received from the VA. The SOC will explain in detail why you were denied for your disability. They will often quote specific statues, and use legal terms to explain why they denied your claim. It can be, and most often is, a very confusing form. They also tend to be quite lengthy.

 

Unlike an NOD, a Veteran only has sixty (60) days to file the next form of appeal, which is referred to as a VA form 9. The sixty days starts on the date on the SOC, not from the time a Veteran receives the document.

 

Interpreting an SOC can be difficult, that is why so many Veterans seek the legal help of attorneys like the ones at Jan Dils Attorney sat Law. We have the people, knowledge, and resources to help you get the benefits you deserve. For a free phone consultation, give us a call at 1-877-526-3457.

What is VA Disability Compensation?

By Jan Dils · November 4, 2011
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A lot of Veterans have VA Disability claims pending, and are well versed in the Disability Claim process. However, if you are recently discharged, or if you have not applied before, you may not know what VA Disability Compensation is, or who is eligible to receive the benefit.

The VA defines Disability Compensation as the following:

Disability Compensation: A monetary benefit paid to Veterans who are disabled by an injury or illness that was incurred or aggravated during active military service. These disabilities are considered to be service-connected. Disability compensation varies with the degree of disability and the number of a Veteran's dependents, and is paid monthly. Veterans with certain severe disabilities may be eligible for additional special monthly compensation. The benefits are not subject to federal or state income tax. The payment of military retirement pay, disability severance pay and separation incentive payments known as SSB (Special

Separation Benefits) and VSI (Voluntary Separation Incentives), and Combat-Related Special Compensation affect the amount of VA compensation paid to disabled Veterans. To be eligible, the service of the Veteran must have been terminated through separation or discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

That definition is a little complicated. If you are interested in finding out more about VA Disability Compensation, feel free to give our office a call: 1-877-526-3457 One of our experienced staff members will be more than happy to help you determine if you are eligible. At Jan Dils Attorneys at Law, are dedicated to helping Veterans get the benefits they deserve.

VA Disability Timeline

By Jan Dils · November 2, 2011
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If you are a Veteran who has a claim pending through the VA, one thing you must prepare for is a long wait. At the current time, the entire timeline can take between two and four years for your final decision. When informed of the above, many Veterans are curious as to why it takes so long. It is actually quite simple. The VA regional offices are getting backed up. With the large amount of claims coming through the regional offices, there is a large back log. Some regional offices can have as many as 20,000 claims pending.

It is also important to know that your location has a lot to do with this timeline too. For instance, a regional office located in a major metropolitan area, like Chicago or New York City will likely be more backed up then those located in more rural areas.

It can be a long and difficult process, but that can be helped by not going at it alone. The attorneys at Jan Dils Attorneys at Law can help you get the VA Disability Benefits you deserve. See why we don’t take no for an answer and why we Fight for Vets.

Initial Application for VA Disability Benefits

By Jan Dils · November 2, 2011
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When a Veteran first decides he wants to file for VA disability benefits, he may be faced with a few obstacles. The first thing one must do is apply for VA disability benefits. To this is quite simple. You must fill out a VA Form 21-526. Obtaining this form is quite easy. You can print it off of the VA Website.

Fill the form out completely, and then submit it to your VA Regional office. This process can be made easier once you become a client of Jan Dils Attorneys at Law. Even if you have not applied for your VA Disability Compensation, give us a call, and we will be more than happy to give you a free phone consultation: 1-877-526-3457.Once you become a client of ours, we will send you a 21-526. Send it back to us, along with the new client paperwork we send you, and we will review the forms before we submit them to the VA. This is just one of the many services we provide our clients.